What next, taxonomy?

Can anyone learn what is happening in a field by following a conference on Twitter? Tha’s how I decided to follow Taxonomy Bootcamp 2012.   I missed networking with a new generation of confident, well-trained taxonomists, but nevertheless, I will attempt to identify the themes and challenges that are facing taxonomists.  Please feel free to add to the list or dispute!

  1. Centralized models don’t scale; think federated, allow local variation.

Taxonomists have jobs because organizations value managing its resources with a common vocabulary, but how the architecture and governance of the vocabulary maps to the internal structure of an organization  is harder to understand.  Speakers urged attendees to allow distributed models that accommodate local variations and utilize local project vocabularies.  Using term sets (facets) help ease taxonomy managemement. As an example,  one tweet posted about the talk given by Gary Carlson and Pam Green, relayed that Microsoft had 23 term sets for its intranet – the most complex was products, and the simplest was confidentiality.  This structure assists in setting up access control to owenrship  groups manage these vocabularies at the group and/or term level.

2. Does social media and information sharing have a role in taxonomy and how does it square with governance, security, control, and confidentiality

This topic yielded some buzz and offers an interesting dialetic between the issue of information access and security. @syndetic tweeted that “HR sees social media as a time waster, and IT sees it as a security probem.”     So let’s start with exploring to see why  social media matters to taxonomists? The main point is that information is ambigouous and confusing, and that social media is necessary to help generate, identify and clarify relevant, lively, topical content now that can be curated later (as opposed to traditional models of curate then share).  AprilMunden  summed the argument for social media nicely in a tweet: “using folksonomy (user generated taxonomy) should defInitely be a part of your initial design AND ongoing governance plan.”   Seth Earley, always with  a witty insight,  said “Fast changing, requires expertise, ambiguous concepts …business can own; slow to change, more security,unambiguous,  let IT own that”     Maybe that’s a strategy for starting the conversation about the business value of tagging and social media.

3.  Why non-expert taxonomist needs to build a taxonomy.

“Experts swim in the deep end of the content.” Tom Reamy made this statement which set off a flurry of sympathetic tweets.  Tom clarified that experts know their content and process but can get mired in details and in their point-of view   Tom’s statement is provocative because it clarifies the role of the taxonomist which is

  • to be apply social  listening skills and analytic methods to categorize diverse needs of a wide range of users
  •  Build a well-structured faceted taxonomy that reflects needs of different constituencies and fits with the governance structure of an organization (see point 1)
  •  Validate and test the taxonomy
  • Assist with the support of application integration
  • Establish ongoing governance processes including use of social media and text analytic to keep the taxonomy relevant

A taxonomy needs to reflect multiple user needs which means allowing non-experts to explore topics before they go in for a deep dive.  Taxonomists need to work with experts to gain their support by engaging and in validating the taxonomy.

3. What aboutTaxonomy, the User Interface, and Big Data and Mobile apps

Taxonomists sit at an intersection between  data/digital assets/content and user interfaces, but it’s not clear how taxonomists apply their skills.  They are not graphic designers or UX experts, and not quite database experts.  A few sessions mentioned data visualization, and other graphic imagery to explore content and data such as   mashups of datasets,  grids, wheels, graphic organizers, or maps. This is an area where taxonomists, who are not as visually oriented, need to rethink their approach, to start to think of themselves as information artists.  Taxonomists can be advocates for adopting in improved techniques including standards that organize taxonomy/metadata framework  and can also advocate for tools that make sharing between across applications, organization and platforms more efficient, which brings us to point 4

4. Taxonomy tools must make it easier to import and export vocabularies

Taxonomists know that their vocabularies need to play well with all the applications above as well as other needs such as the goal of providing cross-organization information access Sharepoint, XML, relational databases, legacy products.   Taxonomies work in part because they are agnostic, because they can work in with any number of technologies, because concepts and metadata are separate from the content.  To play well with others, taxonomy tools  need to support import and export of vocabularies into different standards including SKOS or XML,  As KarlaTR tweeted ”If you put something in a taxonomy, you’ve got to get it out.”     One option is to try tools that are marketed at Taxonomy Bootcamp such as TopQuadrant EVN and Smartlogic which have been ported from the ontology world are now alongside Synaptica and Information Access as part of the tool evaluation process.

So what next, taxonomy?     What is nice to hear is that more taxonomists are surviving because their organizations understand their core roles. What’s the emerging topics  and challenges —  how to distribute and decentralize (localize)  while having authority and control, how to collect new content on emerging, current topics, visualization, how to be more agile, how to fit in with new technologies like social media, mobile, and big data.  Phew!  That’s a challenge.  Taxonomists have a chance to build relationships not only between terms, but with stakeholders in on a the way to a compelling, visualized, multidimensional content strategy.  Good luck.

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