Using Taxonomies to Sort through Health Care Reform

I am very interested in the health care reform debate, thus I wanted to know what a public option might look like. I was told by my sources that a robust public option might look a bit like Medicare. So off I went to the Medicare.gov website to find out what was covered.   In the middle of the home page in the second column, there is  a link to ‘Find Out What is Covered, ” which leads to an advanced search criteria page. The search page  includes picklist of about 143 topics,  just the right size for a sample set of candidate terms  for a card sort.

This month, I am offering a small interactive experiment in online card sorting.   Taxonomies are collections of facets, which are created by organizing concepts into categories.  Card sorting is one of the best ways to identify categories by having controlled tests with groups of users to create categories, that can be validated through repeated tests, until there a consensus.  In health care reform, taxonomies might be useful to help create consumer-friendly interfaces to help search across the national insurance exchanges.

A card sort method uses the following steps:

  • Collect a sample set of candidate concepts
  • Group or cluster terms into categories
  • Refine the design iteratively until there is a set of facets, groups of categories that have similar properties

I’ve put 130+  topics from Medicare into an online card sorting tool called Websort.net.  The topics have not been formatted or massaged; they are just as they appear the Medicare search picklist.   Websort.net suggests  that I use a closed card sort,  where participants sort terms into predetermined categories. So to get  started,   I’ve come up with about 20 starter categories.   Some of these categories will become subtopics in a faceted design

The experiment is open to the first 10 participants who want to take the time to try this task.   To try the card sort, link to

http://websort.net/s/80CDD6/

Please feel free to assign terms to multiple categories or to suggest other categories.

Last month, Joseph Busch blogged about the judicious use of online web sorting tools – that they may not be the most cost-effective way to build taxonomies. One of his arguments is that the sample set of users will not be random. That’s true. This blog has a small readership who have interest in taxonomies, and probably have a consumer’s interest in health care reform. Let me know what you think of websort.net.

This little experiment could help demonstrate some bigger observations. Government may be looking to advanced high volumentechnologies such as clustering or semantic technologies to identify categories and to map claims data.   Perhaps one of the applications will be  to build interfaces that will help consumers search across the national exchanges.  But at the core of these technologies, there will be a need for well-designed taxonomies to help analyze text and building better interfaces to access health care information.

A well-designed taxonomy with facets and linking relationships can

  • Group information into useful categories
  • Identify gaps in coverage
  • Help point to important related information

Let’s find out if taxonomy design can help us sort through health care reform.

Thanks to Andy Oram and the Sunlight Foundation for introducing me to this tool and to Dave Cooksey who is virtually updating my card-sorting skills.

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